According to a recent study, healthy eating is more important than getting enough exercise

According to a recent study, healthy eating is more important than getting enough exercise

According to the findings of a study that was conducted at the University of Sydney, engaging in physical activity on its own would not make up for eating an unhealthy diet. Even if you work out at the gym all day and night or run laps around the track, it is still in your best interest to avoid eating foods that are high in fat and have been processed. The findings of this study lead the researchers to the conclusion that high levels of physical activity do not mitigate the negative effects of a poor diet on the likelihood of dying prematurely.

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According to the authors of the study, people who maintained a nutritious diet and engaged in regular physical activity had the lowest risks of dying prematurely. To put it another way, moving in that direction is the right choice!

Dietary and physical activity habits have a significant impact on the risk of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer in a large group of British adults (360,600). The UK Biobank Project, a long-term, large-scale biomedical investigation, produced such data.

What does it mean to eat in a way that is considered “healthy”?

A high-quality diet was defined by the researchers as anything that included at least five portions of fruits and vegetables each day, two meals of fish each week, and an overall low consumption of red and processed meats.

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People who exercised regularly and ate a healthy diet displayed a 17-percent lower risk of death from all causes when compared to those who were either inactive or following a poor diet. People who exercised regularly and ate a healthy diet also displayed a 19-percent lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease and a 27-percent lower risk of death from certain cancers.