Queensland Forest Clearings Suggesting Bad News for Great Barrier Reef

Department of Environment and Energy has released a report recommending that the forest clearing will be done at northern Queensland’s Kingvale Station. It was first authorized in 2014 with the purpose to make a route for cropping and other activities.

Josh Frydenberg, Environment Minister, will rule on the matter. Forest areas of about 2,000 Hectares, which are right next to the reef, are supposed to be cleared, leading to soil pollution.

Global warming has forced the ocean temperatures to reach 0.68 Celsius over past century. This rise in temperature led to driving two major bleaching events racking the reef into 2 uninterrupted years.

Algae are known to provide the coral with nutrients using photosynthesis. But if these algae are overheated, or more exposed to the sunlight, may lead to producing toxins. The coral then will have to force algae out, which may cause coral to bleach. This bleaching can be threatening.

Shortage of sunlight may also lead to trouble for coral reefs. Sediments that come from the land into the reef obstruct the sunlight on the coral, hampering the process of photosynthesis. It may also lead to damaging or killing of some fauna, which supports the ecosystem.

The Federal Government has announced AU$500 Million investment to improve the Reef’s health in April 2018. AU$201 Million of the amount will be spent on improving the quality of its water.

A spokesperson for the Department of the Environment and Energy has proclaimed that the draft plans for firm conditions and improved measures to reduce the erosion and sedimentation effects on the Great Barrier Reef. Also, it will provide protection for all the nationally listed threatened species.

The Department of Environment and Energy is also planning to drop up the third part of its staff from the biodiversity and conservation division. They are assigned to prevent Australia’s world-leading and accelerating extinction rate. A spokesperson from the department has asserted that the division currently has 200+ full-time staff. These job losses are said to be the result of 25% cut to the division’s budget anticipated in the coming financial year.

Hiren Samani

Hiren Samani

Hiren is an energetic travel aficionado and a gizmo freak. He prefers to write when engaged in finding out how science works on every possible action or occurrences. Hiren is passionate about the work research he does and has succinct knowledge about the same, which makes him an efficient contributor of our team.

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