Portable 3D Scanner to Help Patients Suffering From Elephantiasis

Portable 3D Scanner to Help Patients Suffering From Elephantiasis

An anticipated 120 Million individuals all over the world are tainted with lymphatic filariasis. It is a mosquito-borne and parasitic disease that can pose deformity of the legs and huge swelling, which is a condition dubbed as elephantiasis. Health-care employees depend on measurements of leg to assess the harshness of the diseases. On the other hand, measuring legs that are rigorously swollen often proves impractical and cumbersome.

But now, researchers in St. Louis at Washington University School of Medicine, operating with associates in Sri Lanka, have displayed that a transportable scanning device can calculate limb disfigurement and enlargement more easily and faster in patients suffering elephantiasis. The research instrument makes it simple to get precise dimensions and determine whether treatments are effective to reduce swelling.

The study is posted online this month in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. “This is significant since it will allow researchers and doctors to take very precise measurements of limb in developing countries, where there are frequently restricted tools to observe swollen limbs,” claimed MD, senior author, PhD, Philip J. Budge, to the media in an interview. Budge is also an assistant professor of medicine at Washington University in the Division of Infectious Diseases.

Elephantiasis legs

In patients suffering elephantiasis, the parasitic worms that pose the disease avoid the lymph vessels from operating properly by making their path into the lymphatic system, which results in swollen legs. This disease is also referred to as lymphedema. “Unluckily, the medication does not frequently reverse lymphedema in those who are affected already,” Budge claimed. “The capability of getting these dimensions rapidly will make it much simpler to cure patients, comprising those in clinical tests exploring enhanced therapies for treatment.”

The gadget is fundamentally an infrared sensor, placed on an iPad, which makes a highly precise virtual 3-D image of the legs utilizing scanning tech analogous to that discovered in Xbox Kinect video game network of Microsoft. It was made by LymphaTech, an Atlanta-located startup, to calculate lymphedema that sometimes evolves in cancer patients post lymph nodes are eliminated at the time of the surgery.

After studding about the tech, researchers of Washington University, Ramakrishna Rao and Budge, joined force with worldwide associates to experiment the gadget on 52 patients at a clinic in Galle, Sri Lanka with different stages of lymphedema. Operating at the clinic with physicians, the team made a comparison of scanner results with those from two other methods normally utilized to determine the rigorousness of elephantiasis.

Akash Gokhe

Akash Gokhe

Akash is trained in multidisciplinary disciplines ranging from remote sensing, information science to mathematics. Besides being a student of science, he loves to express himself through words. He believes in the theory that no event which we see in our surrounding is a coincidence or happened randomly. Instead, they are just a consequence of combination of factors which surfaces in space-time domain. Therefore, we must be observant to understand the process responsible for triggering an event. So, he likes to stay observant and whatever he observes or learns from the surrounding, he loves to share to identify the missing links in his interpretation.

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